Review: Miss Morrison’s Second Chance

cover-miss morrison's second chanceTitle: Miss Morrison’s Second Chance
Author: Janis Susan May
Series: – –
Genre: Regency Romance
Length: Novel
Available: Now

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Second chances are often the best.

Twelve years ago, long-time sweethearts, Verity Morrison and Bradford Pemberton, were torn apart by a vengeful act of Verity’s jealous sister. Refusing any other suitors, Verity has descended into spinsterhood at the family estate, her heart broken.

After being disgraced and exiled to foreign lands, a now wealthy Bradford has returned to England in order to get to know his nephew, Charlie, better. He’s quite surprised to run into Verity who is chaperoning her niece.

Their feelings are as intense for each other as always, but Bradford believes Verity long married and Verity believes Bradford is under her sister’s thrall. Neither bothers to correct the other.

It takes a kidnapping, an unexpected rescuer, and mistaken identities to prove that true love does indeed deserve a second chance.


Source: ARC from Vinspire Publishing via NetGalley

This is a fun Regency romp that’s very much in the Georgette Heyer tradition. An older heroine with a young charge, a disgraced former beloved returning after a long exile, a fortune-hunting rogue, high society and a ridiculous turn of events that makes this book sheer fun to read. It doesn’t have quite the zest and effortless historical ease of Heyer, but it gives it a jolly good go and I really enjoyed it.

In fact, speaking of Heyer, this story reminds me a lot of some of my favourites – A Lady of Quality and The Black Sheep in particular – but instead of Bath the action here takes place in London. Verity is a smart spinster who has spent the last twelve years mouldering away in the country, nursing her broken heart. It’s only a risk to the happiness of her beloved niece that tempts her away from home. That same niece who is pretty and lovely, but incredibly naive and unaware that she stands on the edge of ruin.

Actually, this book is as much about Lisbet and her terrible season as it is Verity. In fact, Verity and Bradford spend next to no time together – two brief meetings in which they don’t even talk, before the end. While Verity worries and plots to keep her niece safe, Lisbet is falling in love, getting disgruntled and jealous, feeling put out and getting herself into scrapes. Bradford, meanwhile, is making friends with a nephew he’s never met, cautiously reentering London society and being told lies by Verity’s manipulative sister.

There is rarely a dull moment in this book. It bounces merrily along from character to character, slowly drawing the net tighter around Verity and Bradford, with a wonderful sense of inevitability. Yes, at times, the attempts to keep it all sounding very historical and Heyerish feels a little torturous and I’ll admit it took me a little while to adjust to the affected tone, but I’m so glad I stuck with it because once I was used to it I found it great fun. If you’re looking for a clean historical that is light and lovely, and you’re already a fan of Georgette Heyer, then give this a try. I’m very glad that I did.


Miss Morrison’s Second Chance is Out Now!
Visit Janis Susan May for more details.

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